Van's Health Foods

In Historic Downtown Livermore since 1972

Archive for October, 2012

Aromatic essential oils from plants, when inhaled, enter the bloodstream through the nose and lungs, and can easily pass the blood-brain barrier. But doctor’s don’t know how essential oils influence human behavior. In this study, 20 healthy people carried out a series of math subtraction tests and visual tasks while sitting in a cubicle diffused with rosemary essential oil. As levels of rosemary oil molecules in the blood increased, test speed and accuracy both improved. Researchers also noticed a secondary link to changes in mood, suggesting that essential oils may affect mood and performance through different pathways.

Reference: Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology; June, 2012 Electronic Prepublication

From the September 2012 newsletter

Van's Health on October - 20 - 2012
categories: Herbs
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Vitamins C and E reduce pre-eclampsia

When pregnant, women can have elevated blood pressure, a condition called pre-eclampsia, which may require inducing labor or surgical delivery. Doctors said antioxidants may lower chances of pre-eclampsia, and in this study, 110 pregnant woman with low levels of antioxidants took 1,000 mg of vitamin C plus 400 IU of vitamin E per day, or a placebo, from eight to 12 weeks pregnant through two weeks after giving birth. Nine of the woman developed pre-eclampsia, with eight of the cases in the placebo group, and one in the antioxidant group. Doctors concluded that women who are low in antioxidants may reduce the chances of pre-eclampsia by taking antioxidants during pregnancy.

Mom’s folate levels may reduce emotional problems in children

Doctors know that low folate levels in early pregnancy increase chances of neural tube defects, and wanted to test for a link to behavioral and emotional problems in children. In 3,209 Dutch women, researchers measured folic acid in the diet and folate levels in early pregnancy, and then followed up on children’s emotional and behavioral problems at age three.

Compared to kids whose moms had good folate levels, those whose moms were deficient in folate before pregnancy were 57 percent more likely to develop emotional problems by age three. Compared to children whose moms started taking folic acid supplements when pregnant, those whose mothers started taking folic acid later during pregnancy, or who did not take folic acid at all were 45 percent more likely to have emotional problems. The Netherlands does not require manufacturers to fortify foods with folic acid.

Reference: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research; May, 2012, Electronic Prepublication

From the September 2012 newsletter

Van's Health on October - 12 - 2012
categories: Supplements, Vitamins

Probiotics replenish good intestinal bacteria that antibiotics take away. Doctors say nearly one in three who take antibiotics to treat infection get diarrhea, which may cause them to stop taking the treatment early. In this large review, researchers analyzed 63 antibiotic-infection treatment studies including 11,811 people, who also took probiotics–most commonly Lactobacillus–with their antibiotic treatment. Compared to placebo, those who took probiotics along with antibiotics were 42 percent less likely to have diarrhea as a side effect. People got the benefit regardless of the type or dose of probiotics.

Reference: Journal of the American Medical Association; 2012, Vol. 307, No. 18, 1959-69

From the August 2012 newsletter

Van's Health on October - 4 - 2012
categories: Supplements
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