Van's Health Foods

In Historic Downtown Livermore since 1972

Antioxidants improve memory

In this long-term study, 4,447 healthy French men and women, aged 45 to 60, took a daily combination of antioxidants, or a placebo, for nine years. The antioxidant supplement contained 120 mg vitamin C, 6 mg beta-carotene equal to 10,000 IU pro-vitamin A, 45 IU vitamin E, 100 mcg selenium, and 20 mg zinc. Five years later, researchers measured cognitive performance in six memory and decision-making tasks.

Overall compared to placebo, the antioxidant group had better cognitive function, including 39 percent better long-term memory. In a subgroup of non-smokers, those who took antioxidants had 33 percent better word recall than placebo, and among those who began the study with low levels of vitamin C, word-recall improved seven-fold.

Omega-3 preserves cognitive function

Researchers said this is the first study to report lower chances of cognitive decline in those who took omega-3 supplements. At the start of the study, doctors measured the diets and cognitive performance in 1,475 adults without dementia, aged at least 55. Doctors tested again 1.5 years later and found those who took omega-3 fish oil supplements were 63 percent less likely to show signs of cognitive decline.

Summarizing their findings, study authors said the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA may lower chances of cardiovascular disease, improve cerebral blood flow, decrease inflammation, and slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, all of which may help reduce the rate of cognitive decline.

Reference: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition; 2011, Vol. 94, No. 3, 892-9

From the December 2011 newsletter

Van's Health on January - 13 - 2012
categories: Supplements, Vitamins

Mom’s zinc improves children’s nervous systems

Doctors in this study wanted to see if mother’s zinc levels affected the health of their children’s nervous systems, and said that heart function is linked to nervous-system health. Researchers tested the heartbeat patterns in 165 children, at 4.5 years old, whose nutrient-deficient mothers had taken iron and folic acid with or without 25 mg of zinc per day while pregnant. Children whose moms had taken zinc had slower heart rate, and more balanced and controlled responses at rest and under stress than children whose moms hadn’t taken zinc.

Multivitamins increase birth weight

In the U.S., African-American women deliver preterm and low-birth-weight babies two to three times more ofter than Caucasian women. Low birth weigh is linked to poor mental and physical health later in life. Researchers measured multivitamins in the diets of 2,464 non-Hispanic white and black mothers from just before and during early pregnancy and found that, while there is no effect in babies of white women, babies born to black women who had taken multivitamins were more than a pound heavier on average than babies whose moms hadn’t taken multivitamins.

Reference: The Journal of Nutrition; 2011, Vol. 141, No. 2, 327-32

From the July 2011 newsletter

Van's Health on December - 4 - 2011
categories: Supplements, Vitamins

Living Longer

Doctors believe certain nutrients help balance the immune inflammatory response and may have a link to longevity

Doctors in a lifespan study asked 77,673 men and women, aged 50 to 76, to record which vitamins and supplements they were taking duringGlucosamine 500 supplements a 10-year tracking period.

After five more years of follow up, researchers found that those who had taken glucosamine infrequently or for a short period of time were 8 percent less likely to have died from any cause compared to those who had not taken glucosamine, and those who had taken glucosamine regularly were 17 percent less likely.

For chondroitin, compared to non-users, low users were 12 percent less likely to have died and high users 17 percent less likely.

For omega-3s, those who had taken high levels of fish oils were 17 percent less likely to have died compared to non-users.

Reference: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition; 2010, Vol. 91, No. 6, Electronic Pre-publication

This article was also published in our newletter “Natural Insights for Well Being”, October 2010. Stop by Van’s Health Foods at 2148 First Street Livermore, CA or call us at 925-447-2976 to be added to our mailing list.

You may also subscribe to our blog by RSS or by providing your name and email in the box provided in the right margin.

Thank you,

The Van’s Health Foods Team

P.S. Please feel free to discuss this topic. This is for our community to use.

Do not ask specific questions intended for store employees. Stop by the store or call us with your specific questions.

Heart Supplements – Healthier Hearts, Longer Lives

Women with better nutrient levels had less heart trouble and greater lifespan

A study from the American Heart Association compared 144 woman who had had a heart attack to 288 women of similar age and lifestyle who had not. Doctors measured levels of pyridoxal 5′ phosphate, the active form of vitamin B6, and homocysteine, an amino acid, high levels of which raise chances of cardiovascular disease. Women with higher vitamin B6 levels consumed more B6, had lower body mass index, and lower homocysteine levels compared to those with lower B6 levels. Women with the highest B6 levels were 78 percent less likely to have had a heart attack than those with the least.

Heart Supplements Can Help

In a survival study, researchers measured vitamin D levels in 714 women, aged 70 to 79, and followed up for six years. Women with the highest vitamin D levels, more than 27 nanograms per milliliter of blood, were 60 percent less likely to have died from any cause compared to women with the lowest levels. Doctors believe using vitamin D as a heart supplements may help control inflammation, immunity, blood pressure, and hardening of the arteries.

In an inflammation study, researchers measured the diets and vitamin D levels in 69 healthy women aged 25 to 82, who had either high or low sun exposure. Vitamin D levels in the high sun-exposure group were 52 ng/mL compared to 30 ng/mL for low exposure. In the low-vitamin D group, one sign of inflammation was higher than in the high-vitamin D group, leading doctors to conclude that, “Low vitamin D levels negatively impact inflammation and immune response, even in healthy women”. Adding a vitamin D heart supplements can help with these symptoms.

Reference: Circulation; 2009, Vol. 120, 649-55

This article about heart supplements was also published in our newsletter “Natural Insights for Well Being”, September 2010. Stop by Van’s Health Foods at 2148 First Street Livermore, CA or call us at 925-447-2976 to be added to our mailing list.

You may also subscribe to our blog by RSS or by providing your name and email in the box provided in the right margin.

Thank you,

The Van’s Health Foods Team

P.S. Please feel free to discuss this topic.  This is for our community to use.

Do not ask specific questions intended for store employees. Stop by the store or call us with your specific questions.
Back to Van’s Health Foods Home Page

end of Heart Supplements article

Van's Health on October - 5 - 2010
categories: Supplements, Vitamins
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